ISSUE 002 - DEC 2020

EDITORS LETTER

This year I am craving the escapism of Christmas, now more than ever. Regardless of the current situation, the festive season is guaranteed to lift our spirits! I always find myself excited this time of year, with the joy of the holidays and being able to dress up with the glamour and sparkle for the party season, I might even go as far as to say it’s my favourite time of year. Although this year we may be looking at a different kind of Christmas, due to everything going on, at least we can still have hope, and somewhat of a festive period. We have even curated a sustainable gift guide for you. So you are able to shop sustainably, ethically and consciously this Christmas.


This also comes to be a rather exciting end to 2020, not just for the obvious reason, but as we are now LIVE with the cotemporary fashion platform. Currently launching with sustainable brands; ATU Body Couture, Delayne Dixon, Goldfire London, Kingdom of Wow!, Lalipop Design, Little Dune, SerZi and THE SHIRT OF MY SENSEI. Some of which you will see in this issue! We also looking to sharing with you our curated brands and pieces as we go.

There is still room for a little learning in this issue, we speak with a fantastic author/activist Gittemary Johnsen discussing how we can each make small changes to live a more conscious lifestyle. She truly has some fantastic tips!

And with that I hope you enjoy our December issue!

Sincerely,

Georgia India

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Wear the
FUTURE

We spoke with Annabelle Azadé, the founder of ‘Wear the Future’, which is the first sustainable and innovative editorial fashion agency on the West Coast. WTF helps conscious brands expand their business, by getting the clothes seen on some of the most ‘in’ celebrities of the moment. They also share the clothes on their online marketplace.

What made you want to start a sustainable fashion agency?

Although the press industry is radically changing (more than 4,000 media outlets have disappeared in the US over the past ten years), I do believe media outlets still play a crucial role in the fashion industry because they are the highest point of credibility for endorsements.

What would you say is the most challenging aspect about being a sustainable fashion agency? Do you come across any difficulties within your processes or the people you work with?

I need to double check that brands are all sustainable 100% from A to Z. Vegan brands for example, I need to make sure the glue they are using is not made from fish (most of the glues are, but people don’t know about it), I make sure everything is made locally, I need to make sure they follow a strict ethical line. It is not easy, quite often designers don’t understand the full meaning of it.

How do you solve these issues?

Clear communication and education, one of the main reasons why I’m a mentor at Bloomingdale’s Incubator.

How do you feel about fast fashion brands? How do they affect what you do?

Fast Fashion doesn’t have the same audience, so it doesn’t really matter. It feels like people who are fast consuming are not aware yet, but I think part of my job is also to help people transition. I have helped influencers and brands transition to responsible ways of being, which really does help.

What projects are Wear the Future currently working on to pro-mote sustainability?

We are working on a second edition of Digital Cruise along with major key partners in the industry, it’s a video game, a non-profit and a huge fashion incubator in the US.

How do you see the future of fashion?

The Future of Fashion needs to go hand in hand with education and teaching consumers on why we need more respect for ethical issues in the industry.

Annabelle Azadé

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1. Earrings, £6500, Pippa Small

2. Bag, £1715, Gabriela Hearst

3. Perfume, £80.75, Sana Jardin

4. Soap, £7, Legra

5. Scrunchie, £80, Jennifer Behr

6. Champagne, £32,
Billecart

7. Scarf, £370,
Burberry

8. Lingerie, $140, Anekdot Boutique

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10. Bag, $395, Simon Miller

11. Candle, £15, Foam

12. Earrings, £59, Plumo

13. Water Bottle, £25, S’well

14. Boots, £535, Loeffler
Randall

16. Bra, $95.99, Anekdot

17. Make Up Bag, £295, Anya Hindmarch

18. Socks, £18, A Woven Plane

To the left(top) Siz
Yanoda Trench €250 & Siz Daintree Trousers €170. To the right (bottom) Siz Green
Sundaland Blouse
€115 & Siz Green Tongass Skirt €115.

Siz the brand was created by the dynamic duo Raquel and Sofia who are not only co-founders and best friends but twin sisters too! Growing up the sisters were clearly creatives and had a passion for design, which led them to start SIZ. Raquel and Sofia understood that good design alone, was just not enough in this current climate and that collections needed to always have sustainability in mind.

Their collections aim to transport you to a special place, where you can reflect. Siz’s most recent collection “Beneath the Canopy” is inspired by Crown shyness, a natural phenomenon that occurs among trees and can be observed in tropical forests. It is a reminder that – even when apart – we all live under the same canopy.

Raquel and Sofia have cleverly designed their collections to not only be inspired by climate change and our current environment but to inspire their consumers to think harder about these issues - plastic overconsumption and its polluting effect on the ocean, and the glaciers melting as a result of global warming.

Each fabric chosen by the sisters have been carefully selected to meet their criteria - sustainable, organic cottons, linens, lotus or hemp. They also rescue as much deadstock as possible from Portuguese factories, that they can turn into clever creations. Preventing the “trash“ from going to landfills. Alongside sustainable fabric choices, Raquel and Sofia opt to use sustainable fastenings. Even their studio is a 5 minute walk from their seamstress, where all of their collections are consciously and thoughtfully constructed.

To the left Siz Beige
Sundalan Blouse
€115 & Siz Beige Tongass Skirt €115. To the right Siz
Choco-Darien Blazer
€200.

Ksoni, meaning ‘Earth’ in Sanskrit, was founded by Joti and Banasa who wanted to reduce their plastic footprint, but as women of colour found that the natural products didn’t always solve the issues that a diverse range of hair types presented. Ksoni’s natural bathroom care range was born from their personal desire to enjoy the best of both worlds and ensure an eco-conscious lifestyle was accessible to all, which in 2020 is a must.

Sulphate, paraben and SLS free, their vegan products are completely free of single use plastic.

Ksoni’s aluminium can format provides the best alternative to plastic, enabling consumers to easily embrace the circular economy by re-using materials and keeping them out of landfills. Infinitely recyclable, the can solution fits seamlessly within the current infrastructure and is back on the shelves within six weeks. As cans have the highest recycling rate of any household item, consumers can easily make small steps towards conscious living.

contemporary Fashion
TACKLING THE ART WORLD’S CARBON FOOTPRINT
A conversation with Heath Lowndes, of Thomas Dane Gallery and Founding Committee Member of GCC
  • In October of 2020, a series of London-based galleries launched the Gallery Climate Coalition, out of a shared concern that ‘not enough was being done across the commercial art world to tackle the impacts of its activity on climate change.’ According to Heath Lowndes one of the founding committee members.


    The concept was Initially developed by a group of London-based galleries – Thomas Dane Gallery, Kate MacGarry, Lisson Gallery and Sadie Coles HQ – to have a one-day event to discuss the impact of the art world and address the issues. Due to the UK lockdown in March, it was evident that a physical conference would not be an option. ‘At the same time enthusiasm for the project was building and the sense of urgency from within the community lead us to take the project in a new direction. From what would have been a one-off event the GCC developed into a not-for-profit organisation with a mission to proactively build and distribute industry specific resources not just in the UK but for galleries and art workers internationally.’ Though the public institutions have worked to reduce their carbon footprint and controlled waste for some time, the commercial sector has not made the same strides.


    The group’s core mission, to develop a greener and more sustainable art world which is aligned with the Paris Agreement, to cut the art world’s carbon footprint by more than50 percent over the next ten years, the GCC developed theGCC Carbon Calculator with the team at Artlogic.

    ‘The carbon calculator is specifically designed to enable art galleries and artist studios to get a reliable picture of their carbon footprint in the major areas of their business. We worked with environmental advisors, Danny Chivers and

  • Dr. Harris Kuemerle, to map out the different scenarios in which galleries and artist studios might build up their carbon footprint, putting a strong emphasis on international travel and shipping - a major part of emissions from today’s global art world. The calculator has an intuitive user interface, designed for busy teams to enter data quickly in a consistent and accurate way. The ability to compare transportation options such as air freight vs sea freight for shipping artworks or flying vs taking the train to an art fair will help members make better choices in the future so we can achieve our collective goal in reducing emissions by 50%.


    ‘Since the GCC’s launch in October, more than 170 members have joined, 56 are galleries with the remainder comprised of artists, art organizations and individuals. They are actively recruiting supporters from across the art industry worldwide with the launch of their website being the starting point to build a community database and resources including a range of issues including shipping and travelling, packaging, energy and building management, recycling and more. ‘Our aim is to raise awareness, and to educate others, contributing to making informed operational decisions that will help to cut carbon emissions across the sector. As more members use the GCC’s carbon calculator over time, and hopefully share the data from their results (which they can do anonymously), this will help to build up sector-wide knowledge and measure our progress across the industry in cutting carbon emissions by 50%.


    ’Reviewing and reducing carbon emissions is not new in the art world. Frieze Directors Matthew Slotover and Victoria Siddall are founding committee members of the GCC.Frieze conducted the first carbon audit on its fairs more than a decade ago, and ‘have since made the switch to using

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biofuel which has achieved a 60% reduction in carbon emissions.’

The group is continuing to look to the future and their goals of reducing the artworld’s carbon footprint and remain focused on the commercial art sector and though it was founded by a group of London-based galleries and art professionals, ‘we believe that we can be more effective and bring about greater change if we work together to form a coalition of active members from across the art world.’ The GCC has already increased their membership base and have members joining the initiative from across Europe, North and Latin America and Asia, and the GCC is collaborating with several parallel international initiatives to align targets and share resources. There could be some cross-over with other industries such as events, fashion and film and ‘no doubt the knowledge and resources we are growing, and sharing may be relevant to other sectors as well.’

To become a member of the Gallery Climate Coalition, you can sign up at:

Gallery Climate Coalition

Photo Credits: Courtesy of Gallery Climate Coalition

GCC launched in October of this year, where and who did the idea originate from? How did this go from an event to an initiative during the lockdown?

The GCC evolved out of a shared concern that not enough was being done across the commercial art world to tackle the impacts of its activity on climate change. Although public institutions have been taking significant steps to reduce their carbon footprint and control waste for some time, there seemed to be a lack of equivalent guidance in the commercial sector. The idea was initially conceived between a group of London-based galleries – Thomas Dane Gallery, Kate MacGarry, Lisson Gallery and Sadie ColesHQ – and the plan was to host a day of talks addressing the issues. However, once the UK lockdown was announced in March it was apparent that a physical conference would not be possible. At the same time enthusiasm for the project was building and the sense of urgency from within the community lead us to take the project in a new direction. From what would have been a one-off event the GCC developed into a not-for-profit organisation with a mission to proactively build and distribute industry specific resources not just in the UK but for galleries and art workers internationally.

Additional members have been joining since the initial launch including Gagosian Gallery, how many others have joined since the launch?

Since the launch of the GCC in late October, more than 170 members have signed up, 56 of which are galleries and the rest are artists, arts organisations and individuals. And we continue to actively recruit new members and supporters from across the industry worldwide, encouraging people to sign up and donate via the GCC website.

The group’s core mission, is in line with the Paris Agreement, and to cut the art world’s carbon footprint by more than 50 percent over the next ten years. What initiatives will the GCC plan take to align with this goal? How will they plan to track this?

The launch of the GCC website is really just the starting point, and where we will continue to build up a community database of information and resources on a range of issues including shipping and travelling, packaging, energy and building management, recycling and more. Our aim is to raise awareness, and to educate others, contributing to making informed operational decisions

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  • that will help to cut carbon emissions across the sector.As more members use the GCC’s carbon calculator overtime, and hopefully share the data from their results (which they can do anonymously), this will help to build up sector-wide knowledge and measure our progress across the industry in cutting carbon emissions by 50%.

    Tell me more about the inspiration for the GCC Carbon Calculator designed by Artlogic.

    The carbon calculator is specifically designed to enable art galleries and artist studios to get a reliable picture of their carbon footprint in the major areas of their business. We worked with environmental advisors, Danny Chivers andDr. Harris Kuemerle, to map out the different scenarios in which galleries and artist studios might build up their carbon footprint, putting a strong emphasis on international travel and shipping - a major part of emissions from today’s global art world. The calculator has an intuitive user interface, designed for busy teams to enter data quickly in a consistent and accurate way.

    The ability to compare transportation options such as airfreight vs sea freight for shipping artworks or flying vs taking the train to an art fair will help members make better choices in the future so we can achieve our collective goal in reducing emissions by 50%.

    How are Frieze involved with the GCC? How are they further utilizing the GCC Carbon Calculator in their planning?

    Frieze Directors Matthew Slotover and Victoria Siddall are on the GCC founding committee. Frieze actually did the first carbon audit on its fairs more than a decade ago and have since made the switch to using biofuel which has achieved a 60% reduction in carbon emissions.

    There was a wonderful article in the Financial Times about the GCC Calculator and initiatives, have you seen other industries in addition to the art world, have you seen other industries in addition to the art world, such as fashion, events, show interest and join the coalition?

  • For now, the GCC remains focused on recruiting members from within the commercial art sector and looking to the kinds of activities that are specific to commercial art businesses, although there is of course some cross-over with the activities of other industries and no doubt the knowledge and resources we are growing, and sharing may be relevant to other sectors as well.

    Are you seeing an increase in digital artwork including due to Covid-19 lockdown. Will the GCC monitor if this or other types of mediums increase or decrease which can also potentially reduce the carbon foot-print?

    The rise in digital art formats has evolved out of necessity due to the Covid lockdown restrictions this year. The GCC does not wish to prescribe how artists should make or exhibit their work in future; rather our aim is to raise awareness of the varying impacts of using different kinds of materials.

    Are you partnering with particular sponsors such as air, ground and water freight?

    We don’t have any official partnerships planned but we certainly plan to speak with companies and suppliers to the art world such as transportation and energy providers, to get them on board with our mission and help to impact sector-wide change.

    What additional initiatives would the GCC like to expand into?

    Although founded by a group of London-based galleries and art professionals, we believe that we can be more effective and bring about greater change if we work together to forma coalition of active members from across the art world.Members have already joined from across Europe, North and Latin America and Asia, and the GCC is collaborating with several parallel international initiatives to align targets and share resources.

Dawn Reinholtz

Dawn is a New York-based brand, art, event, and strategic partnerships specialist and producer, leveraging two decades of professional experience with lifestyle, art, media, and events while creating unique experiences for world-class brands. She has worked with brands and artists to bring to life unique large-scale installations such as the Rockefeller Center Annual Tree Lighting as well as collaborations with Jeff Koons, Tiffany & Co, NBC, Swarovski, Ferrari, UBS, The United Nations, and BMW. She has a passion for bringing an artist and a brand’s vision to life.

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We have recently discovered the contemporary homeware brand Collec-tive-Stories and are amazed at their passion for uniting contemporary designand ethical craftsmanship. Working with master artisans around the world tocelebrate their crafts, Collective-Stories create simple yet sophisticated home-ware mixing archaic techniques with a modern aesthetic to create long-lastinghomeware essentials.

Produced in small handmade batches by skilled artisans from around the globeincluding Mexico, Guatemala and The Philippines, Collective-Stories under-stand their social responsibility and recognise how important it is to promotesustainability and preserve the environment. All the artisans that CollectiveStories work with honour the local culture and its traditional craft. This collab-oration enables them to access stable employment, which builds a foundationfor continued development and better living standards. Collective-Stories workand trade fairly with cooperatives who follow fair trade principles, set theirown prices and offer a safe and flexible work environment for the artisans.

When designing and creating, Collective-Stories ensure that all their productsare made from natural materials such as cotton, wool and buri palm. Eachof their cooperative artisans work differently - some of them are dedicated toexclusively using natural dyes, based on methods passed down through gener-ations. Others are committed to using locally sourced materials and ensuringthat their suppliers replenish what they use in order to prevent the exhaustionof materials in one area, allowing for re-growth in every community. A trulyethical and sustainable brand.

Necklace - ATU Body Couture $150.

Dress - Stella McCartney £3700.

Bag - ROOP £75

Ring - Octavia Elizabeth £3040.

Shoes - By Far £381.

Top - Reformation £140. Skirt -Reformation £190

Dress - Mara Hoffman £493.

Trousers - Lalipop $182.
Top - Lalipop
$166. Earrings - Viltier £5950.

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Jade Finnie

What led you to start being more conscious with your fashion/lifestyle choices? And what have you changed as a result?
My shopping habits were very bad! I would order from boohoo and fast fashion places weekly, I started to notice how I would only wear an outfit once and how it would take me so long to get ready! I was living and working in Greece in 2019; I’d been there 5months and realized I had lived in the same clothes for the whole summer, re-wearing them over and over again!

After this I started reading about second-hand September and gave it a go! I had some birthday money that I wanted to spend on a new look in October, but then I started to research fast fashion and made my Instagram, through following many amazing accounts I re-gained my love for pre-loved pieces and never looked back. As a result, I get ready so much quicker now. I can re-wear my outfits and I don’t have a bad relationship with clothes anymore, or myself! I also get lots of messages from people I’ve convinced to use charity shops or to slow down their fast fashion intake which is amazing!

When did you start thrifting and shopping second hand?

My mum has always taken me to charity shops, vintage shops and car-boots. So, I have all my life! But I went fully second-hand and sustainable in November 2019.

What are your top tips for reducing fashion waste?

Beg, borrow and steal!! Not literally ha-ha, I always check friend’s and family’s wardrobes or use swap apps like The Dress Change/NUW/The Swap Family on Facebook before I buy anything! My best tip is wear what you have! And if that fails, charity shops, Depop, eBay and vintage markets. Always always donate your clothes! Sell or swap them! I know people that bin clothes and it keeps me up at night! Love your clothes, fix and mend them before chucking them out! One man’s trash is another man’s treasure!

How do you keep up with the latest trends without over-consuming?

I’m trying to live without trends as I feel this can lead to waste. Once an item comes into fashion so quickly, it often goes out of fashion just as swiftly. This leads to clothes not being worn anymore, which has happened to me a lot in the past. Over the years I’ve loved trends but I look back now, and I wouldn’t want to wear them. However, this does not mean I do not still get sucked in. I love the puff sleeve trend and also recently the sweater vest trend! I didn’t mind the puff sleeves one as I’ve loved them forever a sit’s so extra! So of course, I just went on Depop and charity shops then found them. I also would raid my mum’s wardrobe - as we all know fashion trends always come back around. With the sweater vest trend, I bought a dogtooth one as I love that pattern for winter. So even if it goes ‘out of fashion’ I will still wear it over and over!

@thriftyfinnie

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contemporary Fashion

ATU BODY COUTURE

Known for their functional and feminine designs, ATU Body Couture produce key pieces which are must-have in any wardrobe. The team behind the brand are dedicated to researching new and innovative fabrics, using them to make the most interesting silhouettes, unexpected layering and statement colours.


Based in Bucharest, The Romanian fashion brand was launched in 2011 by Lacramioara Ilie and introduced the incredible Catalin Valean as Creative Director in 2015. The concepts of Valean’s designs often stem from the juxtaposition between natural elements and public space, resulting in a unique style which blends femininity with exuberance.


We feel honoured that such a forward-thinking brand is a part of the Contemporary Fashion Platform.

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We have found that The Little Dune shop has an amazing range of curated conscious homeware and clothing. Each piece is carefully selected to ensure it is eco-friendly and sustainable. A lot of Little Dunes items are aimed at stay-at-home parents, helping them create a space for themselves where they would be able to fully relax and enjoy a quiet moment with a book or cup of tea in their favorite loungewear, journaling or simply savoring the rare moment of having to do nothing at all. A great place to shop for gifts for the upcoming festive period.

ECOSOPHY

 

Ecosophy is a sustainable homeware textiles brand emerging from the UK. Ecosophy produces textilesfor the home which are thoughtfully designed and sustainably made. Their name cleverly combines eco(from the Greek oikos, meaning ‘household’) and sophy(from Sophia, meaning ‘wisdom’). The dual meaning of ‘ecological wisdom’ and ‘household wisdom’ reflects their goal, which is to help customers make ecologically wise choices when decorating their homes.

Their product range, which is textile focused, represents a symbolic link between a consumer’s home and the natural world. Linking the products brought back to process, from soil and land to the farmers, weavers and communities. Ecosophy understand that the textile industry is one of the largest in the world and has huge potential to affect the world in both a positive and neg-ative way. They want to harness the positive side of this potential and show how responsible textile production can create not only beautiful and conscious homes but have an overall better effect on our planet.

Ecosophy draw from natural patterns and textures andbelieve that beauty comes from designing with naturerather than against it. For that reason, they choose to only work with natural organic fibres and use natural,plant-based dyes where possible. This bestows their pieces with a beautifully rustic and authentic feel tothem. We are particularly obsessed with their organic beddings!

When shopping Ecosophy you can be reassured thatyou are making a responsible and ethical choice. Their producer partners all promote safe and fair working conditions, and many are fair trade certified. With the exception of their bed and table linen, which is too large for a hand loom, all of their fabrics are woven byhand and by artisans. Using hand production where possible it requires no electricity or other carbon-inten-sive inputs. It is also an important source of income inmany rural communities.

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To the left (top)
Ecosophy Organic Linen Table Cloth - White £125. To the right (bottom) Ecosophy
Organic Linen Napkins
£65.

  • London based fashion brand VILDNIS have made it their mission to make sustainable fashion the norm, of course without compromising on style. They offer a range of effortlessly trendy pieces with a carefree and edgy twist. VILDNIS’ collections are proof that ethical and eco-friendly fashion can be created to look chic.

    Passionate about the planet and their workers in the supply chain, VILDNIS makes all its products in certified factories, being sure to pay their workers a living wage. All of their

  • fabrics are eco-friendly and include Tencel, organic cotton, recycled polyester made from plastic bottles, organic linen and recycled merino wool among others. Alongside being ethical and using sustainable fabrics, VILDNIS save water and energy by digitalizing their prints and by using new ground-breaking Italian technology. The team at VILDNIS have been using air to ‘wash’ their denim collection. VILDNIS is a brand that is truly pushing the industry tore-think its methods and showing ways in which other brands could be working.

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To the left VILDNIS Iriomote dress £125. To the right VILDNIS Baikal flare jeans £110.

Author, activist, public speaker and content creator Gittemary Johansen is an advocate for sustainable lifestyle choices. She gave us some tips and tricks on how we can all consume more consciously.

Tell us about your activism work?

I think activism should come from many different places at once, so while I think it’s massively im-portant to take sustainable steps in our own lives, which is also what most content on my platforms is about, I also think we need activism in politics and innovation to push the green agenda further. I think consumers should be curious and seek out knowledge about the systems, structures and products we surround ourselves with, and that is the foundation of my work.

What made you become more conscious in your lifestyle choices?

The very first thing I learned when I started to look into sustainability was that every piece of plastic that has ever been used still exists - because it is a fossil material, so it won’t naturally biodegrade, it may change shape or size, but it won’t be gone. This information sparked by a passion for zero waste and individual green actions and later fuelled me to work as a sustainability educator. I realized the physical trash is not all there is, and that sustainability and environmental impact goes far beyond what we put in our bins, even though we started mass producing plastic 70 years ago which has resulted in 8300 million metric tons of plastic waste, this is only one small part of the problem. I think it is just as vital to look into the impact we cannot see, like emissions, the impact of factory farming, the fast fashion industry and so on and so forth.


Could you recommend one simple lifestyle change for someone who is looking to reduce their waste?

If you want to reduce your waste, look at the 5 Rs of zero waste: refuse, reduce, reuse, recycle and rot. Refuse what you do not have need for - there is a difference between “need” and “want”, what is not essential can often be avoided altogether. The things we cannot completely cut out, we can reduce, which is also great. I love the third R, which is reuse, and this will save you a bunch of trash, because a solution for single-use products can often be found in our bins.


What are some of your favourite ethical/sustainable brands?

Mahla Clothing is an edgy fashion brand from Copenhagen that use post-consumer waste fabric and
dead stock to produce amazing and sustainable clothes, so they must be on this list. I also really like Ruby cup, which is a brand of menstrual cups, a product that can also save you from a ton of waste - or about 11,000 disposables at least. A zero-waste shop I love is Life Without Plastic, and Zero Waste Path makes the best shampoo bars.

How do you keep up with the latest trends without over-consuming?

I don’t support trends. Trends are often pushed by big brands and companies because they want to sell more stuff, and as a result lots of trends are born from advertising. The definition of trends is that products like decor, tech, or clothing can quickly go from being over-consumed to becoming irrelevant and “untrendy”. Instead, I always try to stay true to my own style and if I have to invest, I always go for timeless classic pieces.

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Studio .K Ingid Leg-
gings
£80. Studio .K
Freja Crop Top £55.

To the left Konk Furniture, Chamfered Edge TV Stand - Boxy Base £1175. To the right Konk Furniture Waney Oak Chopping Boards £66.

The multidisciplinary design studio Konk produce bespoke pieces of furniture for both commercial and residential clients. Founded by Alex (an architecture graduate that didn’t want to be an architect) Konk has expanded into one of the South West’s leading furniture manufacturers. Everything is handmade to order in their Bristol workshop by an expert team who all share a passion for making.

“Make items that last” – is what Konk lives by. They do not believe in throw away culture. Their furniture is made for life - it’s solid, hardwearing and ages with character. All of the materials used are well sourced and all timber is FSC approved from sustainable forests. When purchasing pieces from Konk you can find comfort in the fact they have a partnership with One Tree Planted, they pledge to plant a tree for every single order they receive.

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Aplós

An Interview with Founder David Fudge. This month, Aplós launches as the first mixologist-crafted non-alcoholic spirit infused with sustainable, organically grown broad spectrum hemp. Combining plant-based ingredients with a complex and full flavored aromatic profile, Aplós offers a healthy new alternative to alcohol and a new way to unwind.

Where did the inspiration for Aplos come from? Who’s visioninspired it?

I have always been a reluctant drinker. I enjoy the ritual of drinking alcohol and the functional benefit that it provides—a way to relax after work or socialize with friends but not the way it makes me feel the next day. Alcohol is so in grained in our culture that we have become numb to the negative effects. I wanted to create a new kind of non-alcoholic spirit that replicated the sensory experience, the ritual, and the functional benefit we crave in having a cocktail, without the negative side effects that come with alcohol. There is a significant opportunity to reimagine the adult drinking occasion for the wellness-minded consumer. When I met my co-founder Jessica Manley, we bonded over our shared desire to create a brand that encourages people to slow down, connect in a meaningful way, and create a world that is a counterpoint to the “always-on” culture.

What are some cocktail recipes that Lynnette would suggest for the holidays / winter with Aplos?

The Conversation Starter:

13⁄4 oz. Aplós

1 oz.hibiscus tea, steeped

1⁄2 oz.

lime juice

1⁄2 oz.

honey syrup 1:1 honey to water

Add ingredients to a shaker with ice. Shake and strain into a coupe glass. Accompany with friends and lively chat.

Where will Aplos be sold and will it be available globally?

Aplos is available direct-to-consumer via our website www.aplos.world.We are currently shipping within the US with plans to scale internationally in the future. We look forward to connecting directly with our customers, understanding their experiences and eventually expanding to boutique hotels, restaurants and bars in the coming months.

With the recent launch, where do you see the brand evolving to over the next five years?

We want to reimagine the adult drinking experience. We envision the bar of the future in which there is a broad selection of non-alcoholic, functional beverages that provide all the good without the bad, and we are excited to lead the charge in that direction. We also want to celebrate thenatural magic that is slow-living, shedding one’s armor and really con-necting with one another in a meaningful way.

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contemporary Fashion

Lalipop

Found in the heart of Istanbul is the sustainable atelier, Lalipop Design. Breaking away from the tradition of mass-production, Lalipop opted to create their own design studio that would be sustainable, eco-friendly and ethical. Knowing the issues the textile industry currently faces, it was of the utmost importance that Lalipop maintained a safe workplace for their employees. Allowing their consumers to have comfort knowing items being purchased have been made somewhere they can trust.

The team at Lalipop work in numerous ways to try and keep the brand as sustainable as possible. By only producing the number of units they need means less energy usage and a lower carbon footprint, and of course less waste. They have set up foundations to upcycle all their leftover fabrics and accessories to avoid waste and stop anything going to landfills.

With their bold and beautiful designs, it’s no surprise their motto is “feel stunning every day”, by wearing their pieces I am sure you would feel stunning every day.

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  • The Small Home is a collection which offers of carefully chosen artisan products that are both useful and beautiful, for the home, body and lifestyle. Their paired-back and understated aesthetic hails the handmade, the natural and the unique. They are committed to supporting socially and ethically responsible craftspeople. Whilst celebrating simple life-enhancing pleasures.

    Dedicated to working with small, socially responsible crafts people and producers. The result is products with provenance from artisans with interesting stories to tell. Their Moccasin slippers and mules are handcrafted from the softest sheepskin for women, men and children. They are an ethically minded small business, and so go to great lengths to make their moccasin slippers as sustainable as possible. The traditional methods used don’t involve any chemicals and only have a very low environmental impact. The skins are sourced from a reputable British sheepskin supplier with the highest animal welfare standards and only uses by-products of the meat industry. All of this means that our moccasins can be enjoyed all the more for knowing that they have be enethically sourced and produced.

    Alongside the slippers, The Small House also homes hand-woven, thick, cotton rag bathmats. A satisfyingly chunky knotted design that feels luxurious under foot. These come in a range of delicate hues including: Almond Pink, Pale Heather, Fog and Milk. Each mat is individually hand-woven

  • on a loom using a traditional Portuguese technique and a smooth, cotton-based yarn. Made from the discarded off cuts of the garment industry in Portugal, these rugs represent anew way to create sustainable products that not only look good but do good too. Small slubs and irregularities add to the handmade beauty of this item.

    The Small House also has a beautiful range of handmade Spanish glassware and vases. All created from 100% recycled glass without any additives, these vases demonstrate that is it possible to produce a high-quality product using recycled glass . The recycling process of glass is a clear example of sustainability. The energy saved in recycling 3 bottles is sufficient to charge a smartphone battery for one year. Each vase is handmade with variations which make it unique, so each vase will have their own story to tell.


    This gorgeous glassware is the result of combining creativity with traditional skills and the latest technology. The sculptural shapes of the vases can look even more impressive when grouped together for maximum impact and mixing and matching the colour palette.

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The Canadian Luxury womenswear brand Delayne Dixon caught our attention by mixing their beautifully crafted romantic pieces with edgy styling and accessories. All of which come straight out of theirVancouver studio, with each piece sustainably handmade-to-order!

Sustainability is at the heart of Delayne Dixon’s principles, as they understand the damaging affect the fashion industry has had on the planet and pride themselves in being as sustainable as possible! Not only do they use eco-friendly packaging, but over 65% of their fabric is derived from recycled materials and dead stock, which would otherwise end up in landfill. They have even created a zero-waste collection, using all the cutaway fabrics to create accessories, which we think is a fantastic idea, and makes us wonder why more companies are not utilising their fabric scraps.

Delayne Dixon go to great lengths to ensure they are choosing the most sustainable and eco-friendly fabrics, such as their leather, PVCand Vinyl, which are all vegan and silicone. They are known for using sustainable substitutes for synthetic fibers such as recycled poly-ester or TENCEL branded Lyocell and Modal fibers. TENCEL fabric is produced with sustainably sourced, renewable raw wood materials. It is certified as compostable, biodegradable and contains no harmful substances.

They are also proudly offering carbon neutral shipping! Although they know it’s pretty much impossible to eliminate carbon emissions caused by delivering packages, it is possible to offset those emissions through projects and initiatives. They offer their customers the option to add carbon neutral shipping to their cart which will be matched with a credible green project close to their location, like a forestry conservation or solar energy project. This leaves their customers comfortable in the knowledge that they have made a conscious deci-sion while shopping.

The vegan, sustainable, feminine Spanish shoe brand has recently been introduced to us, and we are already obsessed! All of theirshoes are ethically handmade in Elda, a Spanish city in the Valencian community. Each shoe is carefully crafted from ecologicalmaterials local to Spain.

Momoc Shoes truly stand out to us, their designs are classy and chic, whilst also being conscious & sustainable. They are cleverlyusing local recycled materials in order to reduce the use of waste, water and CO2 emissions. They use recycled tire for the outsole,recycled wood for the heel, recycled materials such as cotton and post-consumer polyester clothes and plastic bottles for the exteri-or material, and ecological microfiber for the lining. They have honestly thought of everything!

Constantly searching for innovative sustainable materials, they have collaborated with Piñatex who make pineapple leather, andare currently working on a very special model made from cactus leather. Keep up to date with Momoc’s movements and collec-tions via their website -

https://www.momocshoes.com/